Vitamins

Vitamin E

Vitamin E is a vitamin that dissolves in fat. It is found in many foods including vegetable oils, cereals, meat, poultry, eggs, fruits, vegetables, and wheat germ oil. It is also available as a supplement.. The American Heart Association recommends obtaining antioxidants, including vitamin E, by eating a well-balanced diet high in fruits, vegetables, and whole grains rather than from supplements until more is known about the risks and benefits of taking supplements.

Biotin

Also known as vitamin H, biotin is one of the B complex vitamins that help the body convert food into energy. B vitamins, and specifically biotin, help keep your skin, hair, eyes, liver, and nervous system healthy. Biotin is also a crucial nutrient during pregnancy, as it’s important for embryonic growth. There have been many claims that getting more biotin can regulate your blood sugar, promote healthy hair, skin, and nails, and help pregnant moms have healthier babies.

Vitamin A

Vitamin A is involved in immune function, vision, reproduction, and cellular communication. Vitamin A is critical for vision. Vitamin A also supports cell growth and differentiation, playing a critical role in the normal formation and maintenance of the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs.

Vitamin C

Vitamin C is a vitamin. Good sources of vitamin C are fresh fruits and vegetables specially citrus fruits. Most experts recommend getting vitamin C from a diet high in fruits and vegetables rather than taking supplements. Fresh-squeezed orange juice or fresh-frozen concentrate are good sources. Historically, vitamin C was used for preventing and treating scurvy. These days, vitamin C is most commonly used for preventing and treating the common cold.

Folic Acid

Folic acid is a synthetic, water-soluble vitamin used in supplements and fortified foods. It’s a man-made version of folate, a naturally occurring B vitamin found in many foods. Your body can’t make folate, so it must be obtained through dietary intake. Synthesized folic acid differs structurally from folate and has slightly different biological effects in the body. That said, both are considered to contribute to an adequate dietary intake. Folic acid is added to foods like flour, ready-to-eat breakfast cereals, and bread. Folic acid is also sold in concentrated form in dietary supplements.

Riboflavin

Vitamin B2, or riboflavin, is one of eight B vitamins that are essential for human health. It can be found in grains, plants, and dairy products. It is crucial for breaking down food components, absorbing other nutrients, and maintaining tissues. People need to consume vitamin B2 every day, because the body can only store small amounts, and supplies go down rapidly. Riboflavin occurs naturally in some foods, added to others, and it can be taken as supplements.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D IS a fat-soluble vitamin in a family of compounds that includes vitamins D-1, D-2, and D-3. Vitamin D has several important functions. Perhaps the most vital are regulating the absorption of calcium and phosphorus, and facilitating normal immune system function. Getting a sufficient amount of vitamin D is important for normal growth and development of bones and teeth, as well as improved resistance against certain diseases.

Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6, also known as pyridoxine. It’s significant to protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism and the creation of red blood cells and neurotransmitters. Your body cannot produce vitamin B6, so you must obtain it from foods or supplements. Consuming adequate amounts of vitamin B6 is important for optimal health and may even prevent and treatchronic diseases.

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12 plays an essential role in the production of your red blood cells and DNA, as well as the proper functioning of your nervous system. Vitamin B12 is naturally found in animal foods, including meats, fish, poultry, eggs and dairy.

Pantothenic Acid

Vitamin B5, also called pantothenic acid, is one of the most important vitamins for human life. It’s necessary for making blood cells, and it helps you convert the food you eat into energy. All B vitamins help you convert the protein, carbohydrates, and fats you eat into energy. B vitamins are also needed for ,healthy skin, hair, and eyes, proper functioning of the nervous system and liver, healthy digestive tract and making red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout the body.

Inositol

Inositol is a carbohydrate found in your body, as well as in food and dietary supplements. There are various forms of this molecule, and each of them has a chemical structure similar to the main sugar found in your blood – glucose. Inositol plays a role in many bodily processes. Therefore, it has been studied for its potential health benefits. Inositol supplements may help treat specific medical conditions, including some anxiety and fertility disorders.

Thiamine

Thiamine (vitamin B-1) helps the body generate energy from nutrients. Also known as thiamine, thiamin is necessary for the growth, development and function of cells. Foods rich in thiamin include yeast, legumes, pork, brown rice, as well as fortified foods, such as breakfast cereals. e. People also take thiamin to treat inherited metabolic disorders. The recommended daily amount of thiamin for adult men is 1.2 milligrams and for adult women is 1.1 milligram

Niacin

Niacin, also known as vitamin B3, is an important nutrient. In fact, every part of your body needs it to function properly. As a supplement, niacin may help lower cholesterol, ease arthritis and boost brain function, among other benefits.

Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral that is naturally present in some foods, added to others, and available as a dietary supplement. Zinc also supports normal growth and development during pregnancy, childhood, and adolescence and is required for proper sense of taste and smell. A daily intake of zinc is required to maintain a steady state because the body has no specialized zinc storage system.